Discovery That Benefits Humanity

The Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Institute for Brain Science consists of more than 180 faculty members from 23 academic and clinical departments, as well as undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral scientists, and other researchers.

These scholars are:

  • Uncovering the mechanisms that lead to cell death, which can clarify the causes of—and give rise to cures for—neurodegenerative diseases like ALS and Alzheimer’s.
  • Applying computational neuroscience’s sophisticated theories, modeling, and data analysis to help predict who is most at risk for psychiatric illness or suicide and determine better treatments for chronic pain or depression.
  • Gaining insight into how pathways in our brain influence decision making, learning, and reward, which can lead to a better understanding of addiction.

Your gift will help fund bold research that has already begun to yield insights, and will contribute to exploring treatments and cures for some of the world’s most devastating diseases.

“ Our brain science researchers and clinicians are generating new knowledge about how the brain works and developing ways to mimic complex brain function. ”

DIANE LIPSCOMBE Thomas J. Watson, Sr. Professor of Science; Professor of Neuroscience The Reliance Dhirubhai Ambani Director at the Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Institute for Brain Science

The Carney Institute

 

How we're accelerating the pace of scientific discovery about the brain.

Fuel discoveries that benefit humanity.

Help the Carney Institute for Brain Science find treatments and therapies for some of the world's most devastating diseases.


For more information about giving to the Carney Institute, please contact:

Catherine Nellis
Assistant Vice President of Development for Academic Initiatives
+1 (401) 863-9262
[email protected]

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